• JUNE 1- 3. 2022
  • BILBAO - BISCAY

ARTISTS

ALICIA
FRAMIS

Multidisciplinary Artist

Alicia Framis (1967, Barcelona, Spain) is a multidisciplinary artist that comments, in her artistic practice, on outdated or uneven societal power structures and misgivings, formulating in her projects that range in scope from performance art, design, architecture and garments, new ways of reclaiming social spaces for the under privileged, overseen, undervalued, in contemporary cultures. As an artist she deals directly with her role as part of society, staging large scale interventions to shake up general economic systems and social structures. Her interventions are often seen as social sculptures, combining the designed aesthetic and idealist conviction, as an artwork with an active role for the viewer.

Framis was the director of the Master’s program at Sandberg Institute (Rietveld Academy), for Commoners Society which explored new ways of living and working together. She studied at the Barcelona University and the École de Beaux Arts in Paris. She completed two masters programs, one at the Institute d’Hautes Etudes, Paris and another at Rijksacademie Van Beeldende Kunsten, Amsterdam.

Art can function as a strong reminder in the public debate that the shine of innovation and the common markers of prosperity, often actively shape an exclusive model of reality that far from covers the many layered complexities of societies in innovation growth mode.

As an artistic cross disciplinary approach, performance art can on a profound level challenge the broad reverberations of these contemporary societal shifts as an empathic, artistic communication tool for introspection. Performance as a practice can so effectively explore interpersonal relations and social dynamics, as public spectacle or one on one experiences.

The many forms performative artistic practice art can take are always in evolution. Exploring the materiality of performative practice and embracing the fluidity of the form, is of vital importance. Actions, poems, conferences, interventions, immaterial performances, collaborations.

At the same time Framis’ work is not only performance because performance is always something in movement, in her case she works with interactive sculptures, garments, videos and photography.

Click here to find out more about Alicia Framis.


Read on for an exclusive Q&A with Alicia ahead of the Summit:

What does wellbeing mean to you?

For me wellbeing is a state of mind and body in which we are at peace with ourselves and our surroundings. Wellbeing is achieved, it is not given to us. That is why we humans have to always strive to achieve wellbeing. Wellbeing is naturally in nature, it is a state of abundance for humans, but at a time when we break the ecosystem and mankind is more concerned about power than anything else, humans then suffer from shortages and injustices, and then wellbeing again becomes a goal.

Why are you looking forward to being part of The Wellbeing Summit?

It is a great opportunity to connect with other disciplines, I believe the subject is so interesting that I hope connect there with all kinds of visitors: financiers, gurus, artists, creatives, innovators, engineers, etc. I think we have to unite to make our society better, we must live better, it is our right; the state of deprivation, poverty, the cult of the body, are all things that have to disappear.

How does your work connect to wellbeing?

My work connects to wellbeing in two ways: one is by being a part of a group of artists, collaborating with them on this subject. Secondly, the subject of wellbeing is part of my personal research as an artist – the wellbeing of people, how to live better and create new possibilities. I believe that art is a tool to bring people together.

How does your work for the summit bring you and your audience closer to wellbeing?

I believe that my work is a way of reflecting on how we can live better. The paraglider that I am making has a phrase on it that can be seen from everywhere – it says: WE ALL BELONG TO THE SAME SUN.